Message boards : Science : Are black holes and dark matter the same?
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Jim1348

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Message 5010 - Posted: 21 Dec 2021, 14:02:57 UTC

Proposing an alternative model for how the universe came to be, a team of astrophysicists suggests that all black holes -- from those as tiny as a pin head to those covering billions of miles -- were created instantly after the Big Bang and account for all dark matter.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/12/211220120813.htm

This was posted by Kavanagh on the Einstein forum.
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mark,nelson

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Message 5980 - Posted: 8 Dec 2022, 17:35:08 UTC - in response to Message 5010.  
Last modified: 8 Dec 2022, 17:38:14 UTC

I am speculating as an amateur astronomer, but I don't believe that black holes have existed from small t nor are they made of the same stuff (probably a neutron star of really big proportions or something). I do agree with the cosmological idea that big stars, with solar core remnants > 4 solar masses, would likely be the most probable candidate to creating black holes. Although it's currently widely accepted that there is a "monster black hole" in the center of the Milky Way, Sag. A*, are we certain there is an object there or could it be a gravitational focal point? It's probably a black hole from the super, super massive star that seeded the Milky Way stuff? After all, it is a fulcrum amonst the 10M or so stars and other galactic objects. I'd be curious as to the origins of "how the Sun and ecliptic got its spin;" was it something external or something within the atomic constituents?

I also am starting to get a sense that perhaps dark matter may originate from two sources: black holes, where atomic particles are stripped down to their subatomic components and energy, and some off "gassing" from active stars, as a byproduct of fusion. It's fairly well accepted that fusion does eject neutrinos. Solar wind may also contribute to dark matter since after it red shifts, it adds to space, but hypothetically, it could be excited by radiation again?

Also, was our understood t=0 "a The Big Bang" or was it local?
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Message boards : Science : Are black holes and dark matter the same?




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